YO! This Messaging App Has A Lot More To Say For Itself, Even Offline

Mobile World Congress is not the best place to launch a new messaging app: With thousands of tech-savvy visitors in Barcelona, many of them toting multiple connected devices, public wireless and Wi-Fi networks quickly become so saturated that it’s difficult to send a message via Internet, even a brief “Yo,” to a nearby colleague. But that Yo is so last year. The app that could only send one word still sent every message to a central server before bouncing it over to its destination. This year showgoers will be able to try out a new Android app, called YO!, that can send text messages, photos and videos over Wi-Fi to other users nearby without any Internet connection whatsoever, making it a true peer-to-peer messaging app. And as long as they’re prepared to disable certain security settings on their phone, they won’t even need to log on to the Play store to get it: Anyone with YO! installed on their phone can share it with other would-be users over Bluetooth. With the app installed, users connected to the same Wi-Fi hotspot can chat freely with one another—and if there’s no hotspot nearby, one of the phones can be turned into a personal Wi-Fi hotspot and invite other app users within range to log on. While messaging apps such as FireChat can already operate in a local, Wi-Fi only mode, they still require a working Internet connection for the initial download and activation. YO! will install, set up and run just fine without an Internet connection—although if there is one, it can use it to communicate with other YO! users around the world. YO! began life as a skunk-works project at the Bangladeshi development hub of Left of the Dot Media, a Canadian company that invests in interesting domain names and then tries to build a saleable business around them. To free up enough bandwidth for the lead developer’s regular video conferences with management back in British Columbia, his colleagues in the Khulna office would have to log off the various Internet messaging services they used to discuss their work. Frustrated that they couldn’t chat among themselves while he was talking, the programmers started building an instant messaging and file sharing application that would work offline, using only local Wi-Fi networks. CEO Chris Jensen and his cofounder John Lyotier were so impressed when they saw it that they decided to turn it into a service for anyone to use—and since they already knew the owner of the yo.com domain, they decided that would be a good name for it. YO! dropped into the Play store on Saturday night (and an iOS version is on the way, according to Jensen), but it was first distributed in a closed beta test at the Digital World 2015 show in Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month. As the initial 500 beta testers have allowed others to side-load the app using the Bluetooth sharing function, the number of users has doubled, Jensen estimated, based on the limited usage statistics that the app sends back to base when it has a working Internet connection. He expects that number to mushroom, though, as 87,000 people had already signed up at yo.com to be informed of the app’s launch. While Westerners might think nothing of uploading hundreds of megabytes of photos and videos to Flickr or Facebook to share them with someone in the same room, that’s not going to happen in places like Bangladesh. There, unlimited data plans and fast Internet connections are rare, and the dominant mode of sharing is to show someone your phone. YO! will make it easier and more economical for friends and family to share photos and videos. YO! can transmit any media file Android considers shareable, including photos and videos taken with the phone, and even free apps downloaded from an online store, Jensen said, but it can’t yet share paid apps or music files downloaded from services such as Napster or Spotify, which are kept in hidden directories or locked to a particular user account using DRM. However, Jensen sees such uses as a money-making opportunity for the app—and a way to reassure network operators that YO! is not trying to make their networks redundant. A future version of YO! should make it possible to share such DRM-protected songs, films and apps offline, using the cellular network only to download and pay for the DRM key needed to read the files, he said. That, he suggested, is something operators could build into their existing online stores or deliver over SMS, generating revenue without additional network traffic. Source: Click here to view the original article postsed on IDG News Service

Yo !, L’application Qui Permet D’échanger En Wi-Fi Sans Internet Est Disponible

Une nouvelle application développée au Bangladesh pourrait bien mettre de sacrés troncs dans les roues des opérateurs. L’application “YO !” a été lancée officiellement hier à l’occasion du Mobile World Congress par la société canadienne Left of the Dot. Ce nouveau software propose un concept intéressant : transformer son smartphone en hotspot pour partager localement tout type de contenu. L’application qui existait jusque-là en béta privée, est disponible gratuitement sur le Google Play. L’idée est venue d’un besoin propre à l’équipe de développeurs qui, faute de bande passante suffisante, a cherché un moyen de transmission plus élaboré. Le directeur général de Yo.com, Chris Jensen, indique à La Tribune que cette technologie n’est compatible que sur Android pour le moment, ce qui est loin d’être un problème, car cela “représente 90 % des utilisateurs dans les pays émergents “. Profitant du MWC 2015, l’équipe de YO.com s’est rapproché d’Orange, Vodafone et Facebook ; ce dernier ayant des objectifs communs avec Yo.com depuis Internet.org. Le projet est en tout cas prometteur. D’après La Tribune, l’équipe de développeurs annonce pouvoir transférer 500 Mo en quelque 6 secondes. Source: Click here to view the original article posted on Univers Freebox

The Best Of Mobile World Congress 2015

BusinessReviewAmericaLatina.Com Las Apps más innovadoras en Mobile World Congress 2015

Yo! 

Costo: Gratis Fundación: 2011 Esta startup canadiense permite enviar archivos sin el uso de internet, con la conectividad de esta aplicación se pueden hasta un gigabyte de información, desde fotografías, videos y documentos sin importar el tamaño y en segundos. José Ortega, Coordinador Internacional de la aplicación indicó: “Yo! Es utilizada en lugares de trabajo usualmente”, puesto que la fidelidad de los archivos es trasmitida sin problema entre personal interno. Disponible en dispositivos Android. Próximamente en IOS.

Recarga.com 

Costo: Gratis Fundación: 2010 Aplicación originaria de Argentina, y como su nombre lo indica le permite al usuario añadir recarga telefónica al móvil con la compra de tarjetas locales, sin importar en que lugar del mundo se encuentre. Recarga.com ha auxiliado a millones ha realizar esas llamadas de emergencia sin los problemas de telefonía internacional. La aplicación cuenta con mas de un millón de usuarios en la actualidad, siendo Chile, Argentina, Brasil, Colombia y México los mayores mercados en Latinoamérica. Disponible en IOS y Android.

Flapit 

Costo: 299 por la plataforma Fundación: Será Lanzada en mayo del 2015 Esta innovadora Startup B2B surgió en Reino Unido y se ha expandido en Europa. Para la región latina llegará este mayo por medio de órdenes en línea. Desde entonces los pequeños negocios podrán interactuar con el consumidor mostrando sus estrellas en Yelp, la cantidad de seguidores en sus medios sociales, hasta mensajes como “Follow us” o “Like us”, haciendo interactiva la promoción en redes.

CoPilot

Costo: 7 euros Fundación: Originalmente en 1999 Los operadores de autobuses dejarán de tener problemas de navegación gracias a esta innovadora App para rutas de camiones y accesible en los destinos con menor conectividad en la red. Copilot tiene acceso en Latinoamérica, en países como Argentina, Brasil, y este 2015 llegará a México en asociación con NAVTEQ. La aplicación está disponible en Android, IOS y Windows.

Tupediatraonline.com

Costo: Desde 5 Euros Fundación: Actualmente es un portal en línea desde febrero del 2013, la App será lanzada en el verano del 2015 Desde Barcelona para América Latina será lanzada está aplicación para el sector salud B2B y B2C, donde el paciente tiene la oportunidad de realizar una pregunta única o consulta interactiva con alguno de los médicos presentes, esto puede llevarse a cabo por medio de un portal interno desde tupediatraonline.com donde la información clínica del usuario quedará segura. En entrevista con la Doctora Eugenia Fernández-Goula nos mencionó que sus mayores mercados en Latinoamérica están en México, Colombia y Perú. “Acabamos de contestarle una pregunta médica a un paciente de Colombia”, agregó.  Source: Click here to view the original article posted on BusinessReviewAmericaLatina.com.

Hey, YO! Let's Go! - Appszoom.Com

WC15 Round-Up: Hey, YO! Let’s Go! An Internet-free Messenger App

One of my most highly anticipated appointments at this year’s Mobile World Congress was with a little messenger app called YO!

Those who follow me know I’ve been fascinated since this time last year by Yo, the infamous app that can only send that unmistakable two-letter message. Don’t be fooled; we’re talking about a different app here. Add some brand new wrangling of mobile messenger technology, a plan to spread throughout the developing world, and an exclamation point, and you end up with an entirely different YO!

YO! is also a free mobile messaging app, but that’s where the similarities end. Instead of being reducing into minimalist absurdity, YO! is fully-fledged, more like a Whatsapp in terms of its capacity to transfer any kind of data, including messages, video, audio, even .apk application files.

Messenger apps are a dime a dozen, but YO! brings something new to the table: you don’t need any kind of internet connection to use it.

YO! uses our devices’ ability to bounce data directly from phone to phone to communicate without any need for a paid data plan or internet connectivity. Data can be sent along existing WiFi routers and access points as well.

It’s not the first time we’ve seen this kind of technology – FireChat, the app that enabled communication during the internet blackouts of the Hong Kong protests last year, makes use of direct phone-to-phone data to offer hyper-local chatrooms. There’s a world of difference between the two apps, however; FireChat is similar to a giant open graffiti wall in which you can’t choose a specific recipient for your message, whereas YO! has all the functionality of a traditional messenger app.

If you’re reading this from the United States or Europe, you’re likely thinking, “What’s the big deal? Everyone has data.” That couldn’t be further from the truth.

More innovative messaging: 5 Best Instant Messaging Apps That Also Include Free Video Calls (Android)

Cheap smartphones, expensive data

Smartphone prices are plummeting. Basic low-end models are expected to hit the sweet spot between $30-$50 in the next couple months, finally making them accessible to those earning $2,000-$4,000 in countries like India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Vietnam, Egypt, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

The demand for connectivity in these areas of the developing world can’t be overestimated. Much of these populations are mobile themselves owing to harsh natural conditions, poverty, or political instability. Owning a phone means having a fixed identity point, a way to be found, to communicate with family, and to get access to invaluable health and safety information.

With smartphones finally reaching a reasonable price point, the biggest remaining barrier is data. An average 500MB data plan costs the equivalent of 18 hours’ work at minimum wage in India, over 28 hours in Nigeria, and topping out at more than 34 hours in Brazil and Mexico.

By the way, the average US smartphone user downloaded approximately 2GB per month as of November 2014 – four times more than that “basic” amount.

So far, folks in developing countries who have access to smartphones have had to use them as little more than glorified iPods. When they want data, be it pictures from their auntie’s wedding, emails, a favorite song, or an app connecting them to nearby doctors, they have to go to a specific location with connectivity (like an internet café) and pay for the specific amount of megabytes they use.

Instead of the unimpeded information flow many of us are used to, smartphones in the developing world are more like isolated devices, connected only ever so briefly to download and store the most valuable information.

YO! could change all of that with one fell swoop, if it spreads in communities yearning for connection.

A modest collection of our favorite ways to stay connected: BEST ANDROID APPS LAUNCHED IN 2014: Social & Messaging

Bangladeshi beginnings

The initial software powering YO! was developed by the Left of the Dot Media Inc. team out in Bangladesh, prompted by connectivity problems in the office. Apparently, every time the manager was shooing everyone out of the building each time he had a Skype call from Vancouver – anyone else online at the same time would clog the connection.

Power outages are common in Bangladesh, and data costs are disproportionately high compared to local wages. The constant information bottleneck gave rise to innovation, and in early 2014 the Bangladeshi team had put together a communication protocol enabling peer-to-peer connectivity between mobile devices, making use of existing WiFi networks even while the Internet was out.

This basic skeleton of direct communication now forms the backbone of the YO! app.

Send me some love, YO!

Here’s a visual breakdown of how YO! works.

Smartphones with a data plan send information “up” to the Internet unnecessarily. In places where network connectivity is precious, this can quickly overload the pipeline.

YO! works locally, without any need for the cloud, and up to 1000 times faster than Internet communications. If the two devices are quite close to each other, it can be done phone-to-phone, without any need for a router. The other way is through devices all using the same local WiFi network, with the option for sending specific data through the Internet upon authorization.

For users without access to cheap data, it means finally being able to send chats, photos, videos, books, games, music, and .apk files to each other, completely free of charge.

YO!’s mission: “To connect every person on the planet, whether connection to the internet or off-the-grid entirely. Yep. Every single one of them.” Initial distribution efforts will be concentrated in Bangladesh, rural India, China, and Latin America, with an aim to spread organically everywhere people still need to be connected.

Currently the YO! app is only available for Android devices, with iOS expected soon and Firefox OS soon after that. The beta version as of writing supports English, Bengali, Spanish, and Chinese Mandarin, with numerous Indian dialects and Brazilian Portuguese planned for the first half of 2015.

Article source: Click here to read the original article posted on Appszoom.com. 


YO! Reviewed On DeGroupNews.Com

Yo !, l’application qui transforme votre smartphone en hotspot

L’application a officiellement été dévoilée lundi à l’occasion du Mobile World Congress de Barcelone. Son concept innovant pourrait bien révolutionner notre façon de partager du contenu. Partager du contenu sans Internet

  Yo ! est une application au concept prometteur. Elle permet de partager du contenu et de se connecter sans réseau et en pair-à-pair. Ce sont les canadiens de Left of the Dot qui ont donné vie au concept pour leur besoin personnel. Leur équipe de développeurs basée au Bangladesh ne disposait pas d’assez de bande passante pour transférer des données.   En effet dans la plupart des pays émergents, la vitesse de navigation est souvent limitée et les forfaits mobiles incluant la data Internet sont très onéreux.   Les développeurs ont donc cherché une solution pour communiquer malgré ces contraintes. Ils ont mis au point la technologie « Hyperlocal », qui vous connecte aux personnes connectées sur un même réseau Wi-Fi, sans jamais avoir recours à Internet, le tout sans le moindre coût.   Comme l’explique l’International Business Times : « Une fois l’application installée, les utilisateurs connectés sur un même réseau Wi-Fi peuvent discuter librement entre eux, et s’il n’y a pas de bornes Wi-Fi dans les environs, un des smartphones peut devenir un hotspot Wi-Fi personnel et inviter les utilisateurs à proximité à se connecter ».   Elle serait en mesure de transférer 500 Mo en 6 secondes.   Les opérateurs aux aguets   Selon Chris Jensen, directeur général de Yo.com et co-fondateur de Left of the Dot, il n’est pas nécessaire d’avoir recours aux données Internet coûteuses pour une bonne partie des transferts que l’on effectue sur nos smartphones. Il explique : « Une grande partie des documents que l’on partage, des photos, des messages, des vidéos, le sont entre des personnes qui sont dans la même pièce, ou à quelques mètres de distance. Pourquoi alors passer par Internet, par des serveurs au Texas par exemple pour WhatsApp ? ».   L’application pourrait donc révolutionner notre manière de consommer de la data et venir faire de l’ombre aux offres des opérateurs.   Yo ! dans la lignée d’Internet.org   Avec son concept de connectivité hyperlocale, les créateurs de l’application assurent pouvoir connecter l’ensemble des personnes sur le globe. Une ambition qui pourrait bien charmer Mark Zuckerberg et son projet Internet.org, qui vise lui aussi à améliorer la connectivité partout dans le monde.   Les fondateurs auraient profité du MWC de Barcelone pour approcher les leaders ralliés à cette même cause, notamment Orange, très présent en Afrique. On pourrait donc s’attendre à voir naître de nouveaux partenariats à la suite du congrès.   L’application est pour l’heure disponible sur Google Play uniquement. Elle existe en plusieurs langues, dont le bengali, le mandarin ou l’hindi. Une version iOS devrait voir le jour très prochainement, comme l’indique le site web de l’application.   Source: Click here to view the original article posted on De Group News.

YO! Reviewed By PC World

YO! This messaging app has a lot more to say for itself, even offline

Mobile World Congress is not the best place to launch a new messaging app: With thousands of tech-savvy visitors in Barcelona, many of them toting multiple connected devices, public wireless and Wi-Fi networks quickly become so saturated that it’s difficult to send a message via Internet, even a brief “Yo,” to a nearby colleague.

But that Yo is so last year. The app that could only send one word still sent every message to a central server before bouncing it over to its destination.

This year showgoers will be able to try out a new Android app, called YO!, that can send text messages, photos and videos over Wi-Fi to other users nearby without any Internet connection whatsoever, making it a true peer-to-peer messaging app. And as long as they’re prepared to disable certain security settings on their phone, they won’t even need to log on to the Play store to get it: Anyone with YO! installed on their phone can share it with other would-be users over Bluetooth.

With the app installed, users connected to the same Wi-Fi hotspot can chat freely with one another—and if there’s no hotspot nearby, one of the phones can be turned into a personal Wi-Fi hotspot and invite other app users within range to log on.

While messaging apps such as FireChat can already operate in a local, Wi-Fi only mode, they still require a working Internet connection for the initial download and activation. YO! will install, set up and run just fine without an Internet connection—although if there is one, it can use it to communicate with other YO! users around the world.

YO! began life as a skunk-works project at the Bangladeshi development hub of Left of the Dot Media, a Canadian company that invests in interesting domain names and then tries to build a saleable business around them. To free up enough bandwidth for the lead developer’s regular video conferences with management back in British Columbia, his colleagues in the Khulna office would have to log off the various Internet messaging services they used to discuss their work. Frustrated that they couldn’t chat among themselves while he was talking, the programmers started building an instant messaging and file sharing application that would work offline, using only local Wi-Fi networks.

CEO Chris Jensen and his cofounder John Lyotier were so impressed when they saw it that they decided to turn it into a service for anyone to use—and since they already knew the owner of the yo.com domain, they decided that would be a good name for it.

YO! dropped into the Play store on Saturday night (and an iOS version is on the way, according to Jensen), but it was first distributed in a closed beta test at the Digital World 2015 show in Dhaka, Bangladesh, last month. As the initial 500 beta testers have allowed others to side-load the app using the Bluetooth sharing function, the number of users has doubled, Jensen estimated, based on the limited usage statistics that the app sends back to base when it has a working Internet connection. He expects that number to mushroom, though, as 87,000 people had already signed up at yo.com to be informed of the app’s launch.

While Westerners might think nothing of uploading hundreds of megabytes of photos and videos to Flickr or Facebook to share them with someone in the same room, that’s not going to happen in places like Bangladesh. There, unlimited data plans and fast Internet connections are rare, and the dominant mode of sharing is to show someone your phone. YO! will make it easier and more economical for friends and family to share photos and videos.

YO! can transmit any media file Android considers shareable, including photos and videos taken with the phone, and even free apps downloaded from an online store, Jensen said, but it can’t yet share paid apps or music files downloaded from services such as Napster or Spotify, which are kept in hidden directories or locked to a particular user account using DRM.

However, Jensen sees such uses as a money-making opportunity for the app—and a way to reassure network operators that YO! is not trying to make their networks redundant. A future version of YO! should make it possible to share such DRM-protected songs, films and apps offline, using the cellular network only to download and pay for the DRM key needed to read the files, he said. That, he suggested, is something operators could build into their existing online stores or deliver over SMS, generating revenue without additional network traffic.

Source: Click here to read the original article posted by PC World.


YO!: Share And Connect Without The Internet - SD Asia

YO! is a hybrid social messaging and sharing app with a unique catch: its users can connect with each other on a wireless, Internet-less network.   Currently in beta testing, Yo!’s origins are distinctly rooted in the Bangladeshi business context. The patent-pending technology behind YO! has been developed by the Bangladeshi office of Canadian developer Left of Dot Media Inc. YO! is not to be confused with the other Yo app that launched in Jun 2014. That app, which centers entirely around users sending each other a single word (Yo), operates in an entire different ballgame than this YO!. Available in Bangla, English, and Spanish languages, the app was announced at the recent Digital World 2015. “Our goal is to connect every person on the planet, so it makes sense for us to start in Bangladesh where the idea came to life,” said John Lyotier, Co-Founder and CMO, Left of the Dot Media. “We built YO! because we had a pain we needed to solve,” said Rakibul Islam, CEO of W3Engineers, and Managing Director for Left of the Dot in Bangladesh. “We are pleased to launch the app here first.” SD Asia had a chance to visit YO!’s stall on the last day of Digital World, and sit down with Md. Saifur Rahman, Development Manager at W3Engineers. We discussed in length about YO!: its features, strengths, and how the team is going to move forward with its launch worldwide.   Tell us about your app:     SR: YO! is a free mobile app that functions as chatting and sharing app. It empowers users to share messages as well as content like apps, photos, videos and music. While it can connect to the Internet, YO!’s winning feature is its hyperlocal connectivity. You can create an instant hotspot, which will create a network that can be joined by anyone using the same router or access point. It’s very easy to create, and also very secure. The network is peer-to-peer and any data you share with each other doesn’t pass through cloud servers, ensuring your privacy. This independence from servers also means that content sharing on Yo! is that much faster, up to x1000 more, in fact than the current internet connectivity in Bangladesh.   What is your company intending to do with YO! at this stage?   SR: We will be releasing our app for free on Google Play and iOS very soon. Our plan is to build a solid userbase worldwide. That’s our priority right now, we might go into the revenue-generating aspects of our strategy once that happens.   How are you planning to reach out to your target audience?   SR: We are participating in various fairs around the world, like we are doing with Digital World, to raise awareness about YO! . After this, we are looking forward to the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain that’s about to start this March. We also have various marketing teams around the world who are engaging in various promotional activities.   Do you think you have any competitors in your target market?   SR: Well, yes we do. Since messaging is such a big component of our app, it has to compete with a lot of the messengers that are already out in the market. Since we are still quite new, we may not have some of the features that established apps like Viber and Whatsapp are offering, like audio and video conference. From a file-sharing perspective, apps like Shareit can give us a run for our money. They already are doing pretty well, but I think we have an edge on them due to the duality of YO! as a chatting and sharing app. Though it’s still very early stage for us, I think we are offering richness in a lot of our core features that our competitors don’t have at the moment.   Right. No one else has your core USP at the moment, and that’s a big advantage for your app.   SR: Exactly. No one else is offering the option to maintain a social platform through local network connectivity that doesn’t use the Internet. We are hoping that goes over well with our target audience.   In closing, could you tell us why you think people should use YO!?   SR: The number of smartphone users around the world has grown at an amazing fast rate. However, in many places, especially in the developing world, the mobile Internet infrastructure hasn’t developed fast enough for these devices. A lot of the time the Internet is just too slow, and for a country like Bangladesh often the data is just too expensive to share. YO! provides a simple yet powerful solution to this dilemma. It lets you engage in major social activities on a hyper local network with really high speeds. For free, too. Simply said, YO! empowers users to share and connect without the Internet.     Source: Click here to view the original article by SD Asia.

YO! at TC3 - Webwire.com

Telecom executives at TC3 selected YO! from Yo.com as best new technology demo

From 40 technology demos at TC3 2014, 400 executives including 40+ global carriers selected wifi sharing app, YO! as their favorite new technology demo.

The Summit brings together young cutting-edge companies with the decision-makers in the industry to move innovation to the market faster. The TC3 Demo Pavilion housed over 40 new technology demos spanning from analytic and security to small cells and smart devices. Over the 2-day Summit, the attendees voted for their favorite demos and selected, wifi sharing app, YO! from Yo.com.

“The Telecom Council is proud to help connect young companies with innovative ideas, like YO!, with decision-makers in the telecom industry,” said Liz Kerton, President of the Telecom Council of Silicon Valley.

“It was a great coming out party for YO! and YO.com as this was the first time we shared our vision and product for connecting the unconnected,” said John Lyotier, Co-Founder and CMO of Left of the Dot Media, parent company for YO.com. “Great thanks to the Telecom Council for allowing us to demonstrate that YO! can provide peer-to-peer mobile connectivity and sharing over WiFi, without users ever touching the Internet.”

Continued Lyotier, “We knew that we had a great solution for developing markets where data costs are prohibitive and transmission speeds are abhorrent, but the event also allowed us to validate that we address a real problem faced by telecom carriers around the world while giving them a value-added service that they could bring to their customers.”

About the TC3 Summit

TC3: Telecom Council Carrier Connections is a 2-day executive summit organized by the Telecom Council of Silicon Valley to broadcast the innovation priorities of 50+ global telcos and connect them to the startups, entrepreneurs, and VCs who will build telecom’s next generation of fixed and wireless products and services. 2015’s TC3 Summit will happen Sept. 30-Oct. 2. Online at http://www.telecomcouncil.com/tc3.

About YO!™

YO! is a free mobile app from YO.com and Left of the Dot Media that empowers users to share and connect without the Internet. YO! recognizes that mobile users around the world have incredibly smart devices capable of producing and viewing amazing content, yet these same users have difficulty in sharing or accessing this content as data transmission over standard networks and the Internet is just too slow. This problem is exacerbated in developing markets where it is just too expensive to share. YO! lets people share photos, videos, apps, and messages across a hyperlocal network at high speeds and for free. While still in private beta, we’re sharing our story as it happens. Follow along at: http://www.yo.com.

Source: Click here to read the original article written by WebWire.